“Greatness” Comes from Intelligent Serendipitous Discovery, Not Objectives, According to UCF Computer Science Researcher Kenneth Stanley

“Greatness” Comes from Intelligent Serendipitous Discovery, Not Objectives, According to UCF Computer Science Researcher Kenneth Stanley

UCF College of Engineering and Computer Science artificial intelligence researcher and associate professor Kenneth Stanley, Ph.D., provides a thought-provoking and contrarian perspective on how “greatness” is achieved.  In the soon-to-be-released book Why Greatness Cannot Be Planned: The Myth of the Objective, Stanley and co-author Joel Lehman, Ph.D., explore the provocative concept that setting specific goals […]

UCF Honors 8 with Inaugural Reach for the Stars Award

UCF’s newest Founders’ Day recognition honors early-career professors who have achieved noteworthy research or creative activities of national impact. The Reach for the Stars Award winners are selected by President John C. Hitt. They must be assistant or associate professors who have completed four years at UCF. Those selected receive a $10,000 annual research grant […]

Robots: From the Big Screen to the Real World

From the Jetsons’ futurist maid, Rosey, to the Terminator and the Transformers, movies about the role smart robots can play in our lives have captured the imagination. At noon Saturday, Jan. 18, Enzian Theater will present Steven Spielberg’s “A.I. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE” as part of a series called Science on the Screen. University of Central Florida […]

Computer Scientists Suggest New Spin on Origins of Evolvability

Scientists have long observed that species seem to have become increasingly capable of evolving in response to changes in the environment. But computer science researchers now say that the popular explanation of competition to survive in nature may not actually be necessary for evolvability to increase. In a paper published this week in PLOS ONE, […]


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This UCF-Designed Tech is Amazing

A team of UCF scientists has developed a new process for creating flexible supercapacitors that can store more energy and be recharged more than 30,000 times without degrading. The novel method from the University of Central Florida’s NanoScience Technology Center could eventually revolutionize technology as varied as mobile phones and electric vehicles. “If they were to replace the batteries with these supercapacitors, you could charge your mobile phone in a few seconds and you wouldn’t need to charge it again for over a week,” said Nitin Choudhary, a postdoctoral associate who conducted much of the research.