Students Visit Remarkable Craniofacial Treatment Center in Brazil

Students Visit Remarkable Craniofacial Treatment Center in Brazil

After an eight-hour flight and a five-hour bus ride, five UCF communication sciences and disorders graduate students and their faculty advisor were eager to begin their 2017 spring break in Bauru, Brazil, participating in a study-abroad clinical experience of a lifetime. Their ultimate destination? The largest craniofacial treatment center in the world, Centrinho — The Hospital […]

UCF Showcases Aphasia House at International Leadership Summit

International leaders who study and care for people who’ve lost their ability to speak recently gathered at UCF to discuss new therapy that can profoundly improve a client’s quality of life. Some 140 researchers and practitioners from across the United States and Canada came to discuss ways to serve individuals who have aphasia, a condition […]

Faculty Members, Student Group to Receive National Speech-Language Pathology Awards

UCF will be well-represented at this week’s awards ceremony of the 2016 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in Philadelphia. Two leading scholars and a student organization from the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders will receive top awards Nov. 18. Professor Michael Crary will receive ASHA’s most prestigious award, Honors of the Association, for lifetime achievement and excellence. Crary has […]

NIH Funds Study on Technology, Services for Children with Severe Speech Disabilities

Jennifer Kent-Walsh, professor of communication sciences and disorders, has been awarded a $437,812 grant from the National Institutes of Health to improve clinical services for young children with severe speech disabilities. Kent-Walsh studies the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) by individuals with severe speech problems to express their thoughts, needs, wants and ideas. […]


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This UCF-Designed Tech is Amazing

A team of UCF scientists has developed a new process for creating flexible supercapacitors that can store more energy and be recharged more than 30,000 times without degrading. The novel method from the University of Central Florida’s NanoScience Technology Center could eventually revolutionize technology as varied as mobile phones and electric vehicles. “If they were to replace the batteries with these supercapacitors, you could charge your mobile phone in a few seconds and you wouldn’t need to charge it again for over a week,” said Nitin Choudhary, a postdoctoral associate who conducted much of the research.