Hazing: It’s Everyone’s Problem

National Hazing Prevention Week

Hazing: It’s Everyone’s Problem

The Silent March began at the Student Union and ended at the CFW Arena.

The Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life sponsored several events during National Hazing Prevention Week.

Students stood in line at the Student Union to sign their names to the “No-Hazing Pledge” banner. UCF Haze-free Community “#NOEXCUSES” buttons were available. The signed banners were proudly held in support as hundreds of students, faculty and staff walked in the “Silent March” from the Student Union to the CFE Arena.

Other activities included a panel discussion with Victim Services and presentation by Michael Ayalon, Sigma Pi executive director. A hazing prevention movie was shown in the Pegasus Ballroom where white NHPW shirts were given out. Everyone was asked to wear their NHPW shirts or a white shirt to the UCF vs. South Carolina football game.

Michelle Quinones, coordinator for the Office of Student Conduct, stated in an article, “Hazing – It’s Everyone’s Problem,” in the Faculty Focus Vol. 12, No. 2 2013 edition:

The University of Central Florida does not condone hazing in any form and outlines specific behaviors that fall within the scope of the hazing definition. Behaviors can range from the subtle to the most severe. Examples include:

  • Sleep deprivation, forced exclusion from social contact, forced contact which could result in embarrassment
  • Brutality of a physical nature such as whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, exposure to the elements
  • Forced consumption of any food, liquor, liquid, drug or other substances
  • Forcing or requiring the violation of University policies, federal, state or local law.

Any activity which could subject the individual to mental or physical stress, or adversely affect the mental or physical health or dignity of the individual can be considered hazing. It is important to note that hazing can be a direct or indirect condition of admission into or association with a student organization. An activity as described above will be presumed to be a “forced” activity, regardless of whether the individual willingly chose to participate.

Read the complete article at: www.fctl.ucf.edu/Publications/FacultyFocus/content/2013/2013_august.pdf